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Is There A Right Or Wrong Way To Look At Art? How To Look At Art [Studying The Masters]

Articles, Studying The Masters, Uncategorized

Is there a right or wrong way to look at art?

The short answer is no.

However, there are steps that can make the process more enjoyable, more enriching, and give you a much greater understanding of what the artist was trying to communicate.

A common problem that art viewers and gallery or museum visitors share is that they can feel like they’re looking at the artworks, but not really seeing them. This can be an isolating feeling and cause viewers to start doubting themselves.

The good news is that you don’t have to be an art scholar or possess any natural talents in order to really see art, and analyse the works that really catch your eye.

In order to develop as an artist, especially an artist intent on Studying the Masters; being able to effectively break down and analyse art is an essential skill for the toolbelt. Without understanding a little about what is going on in an artwork, it would be difficult to truly study it and learn from it.

This doesn’t only apply to artists though; if you are an observer, a casual viewer of art, then you will certainly find that developing a better understanding of how to analyse art will give you more of an appreciation for it.

In this article, we’ll discuss a method for analysing artworks using a series of questions; a systematic approach that can be followed as much or as little as you see fit.

After reading this and giving it a go, you will see for yourself that you do not need to be an art scholar in order to view art like an expert.

Master Study – Art History Roundup – June – Rubens – Leonardo da Vinci – Michelangelo

Studying The Masters

Here we are with another video!


Studying The Masters Website Coming Soon!!!


Join The #StudyingTheMasters Art Community!

Click the follow button to never miss a post and become a part of this great community where together we can study the works of the Old Masters and learn the skills and techniques that they used to portray the world around them.

– The main hubs are on Instagram and Facebook –

Links –

Instagram – @StudyingTheMasters

Facebook Group – Studying The Masters

Blog – Studying The Masters

YouTube Channel – Studying The Masters


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YouTube Video Master Study – Leonardo da Vinci – Study of Two Warriors’ Heads

Studying The Masters

The First Video Is Live!

So it’s the 21st of the month and that means one thing – YouTube video! This one is the first one I’ve done and therefore slightly rusty but the learning process has been immense, the software that I’ve decided to go with seems very promising as well.

The Master Work

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Leonardo da Vinci – Study of Two Warriors’ Heads

#MasterpieceMonday – Peter Paul Rubens – The Battle of Anghiari Copy – 1603

Studying The Masters

So let’s begin the inspiration with a #MasterpieceMonday post – This particular artwork in its preparations and various copies of the original will be of special note for this month’s #StudyingTheMasters – also of note, this particular piece is a master study of a Leonardo da Vinci artwork by Rubens.

Peter Paul Rubens – The Battle of Anghiari Copy – 1603

‘The Battle of Anghiari’ by Peter Paul Rubens, is a copy of a fresco that was painted around 1503-06 by Leonardo da Vinci and although the fresco itself was never completed, it was also destroyed around 1560; some 43 years before Rubens made his copy.

Leonardo da Vinci had made a number of preparatory studies for the original painting that still exist and the central section of the composition is known through this copy by Rubens. Rubens’ copy was based on an engraving by Lorenzo Zacchia in 1553 based on the cartoon of Leonardo da Vinci.

Rubens was successful in portraying the intense fury, emotions and sense of power that was present in the original painting by Leonardo. There have also been similarities noted between this piece and The Hippopotamus and Crocodile Hunt painted by Ruben around 1616.


Join The #StudyingTheMasters Art Community!

Click the follow button to never miss a post and become a part of this great community where together we can study the works of the Old Masters and learn the skills and techniques that they used to portray the world around them.

– The main hubs are on Instagram and Facebook

Links –

Instagram – @StudyingTheMasters

Facebook Group – Studying The Masters

Blog – Studying The Masters

Studying The Masters – Test Blog Post

Studying The Masters

Hello and welcome to Studying The Masters.

I have started this community as a place both for myself to improve my skills and to also encourage learning and growth amongst fellow artists; students and professionals alike. I intend for this to be the beginnings of a community of like-minded individuals with a passion to learn the skills and techniques of our forebears and to also learn more about art history in general.

This space is one that will thrive on communication, friendly critiques and encouragement, a space to build one another up in the arts, sharing knowledge as well as comments and insights.

Predominantly this platform will best serve those who are striving to study the works of the Old Masters; examining their techniques and the way they overcame problems. However, I would like this space to inspire and inform all aspects of the arts: poets, actors, dancers, writers, etc. Whatever the branch of the artistic spectrum, please feel free to chime in and offer a response to the studies and artworks that are put out.

Recommendations of artworks to study, research and find out more about are always welcome, feel free to become a part of this community of artists and help bring the Old Masters back to life!